Update: Children found safe after Police searching for missing children in Scott County

The children were found safe and reunited with their grandfather.


A search is underway for two children who went missing while hiking with their grandfather in Scott County, Virginia.

Police told WCYB they are searching for a 17-year-old girl and an 11-year-old boy.

They got separated while hiking around 9a.m. this morning. They were last seen in the hanging rock park area.

Several agencies are assisting in the search, including med-flight.

If you have information you're asked to call police.

Courtesy of-

http://www.wcyb.com/news/Missing-children-in-Scott-County/40805182

Health Wagon to present “A More- or Less- Perfect Union documentary

The premiere of the new documentary, A More- or Less- Perfect Union, will be hosted by The Health Wagon at the Park Avenue Theater on Friday, July 22 and Saturday, July 23 at 7:00 p.m. The screening will be followed by a discussion of the film's themes lead by writer/director Jim Gabbe.

The documentary asks a question central to the current state of the United States: is our Union as hopelessly divided as many of our politicians and media pundits would have us believe?

WCSO Weekly Activity Report

The Wise County Sheriff’s Office reports the following activities for the period of 07/04/2016 through 07/10/2016.

Wise Central Dispatch received a total of 1,554 calls for this seven-day period.
Of the total calls received 289 were dispatched to the Sheriff’s Office
Total number of Domestic calls for this period was 7.
Criminal Process for this period: Served 24 Felony Warrants, 31 Misdemeanor Warrants, 2 DUI Arrests.
Civil Process Served: 244 Civil Papers
Traffic Accidents: 4
4 Additional Criminal Investigations were initiated and 6 Cleared by Arrest.
Sheriff’s Office provided 208 man-hours of Court Room Security.
Unlocked Vehicles: 20
Escorted Funerals: 5

The Sheriff’s Office Total Transport for this period: 6
Total Transport Hours: 20.5

1,419 Visitors to Courthouse.

Five sentenced in synthetic drug conspiracy

Sentences were handed down to five people in federal court this week for their roles in a massive conspiracy to distribute the drug alpha-PVP, known as Gravel, in Southwest Virginia from 2012 to 2015.

All five previously pleaded guilty to at least one count of conspiracy to distribute and possess with the intent distribute alpha-PVP.

Evidence presented at previous hearings showed that those five and other members of the conspiracy placed orders for the powder form of alpha-PVP from distributors in Florida and China. Those orders would be shipped to an address in Wise, Virginia, and the packages would then be retrieved and distributed to mid and low-level dealers around Wise for distribution, the release stated.

The hard form of alpha-PVP, known as Gravel, would be transported to suppliers in North Carolina and Tennessee from Wise. Those involved in the conspiracy would break down the larger quantities of gravel into smaller amounts for sale to users.

“Synthetic drugs are often times more dangerous and addicting than street drugs,” United States Attorney John P. Fishwick said in a press release. “We will continue to dedicate federal resources to working with our law enforcement partners to ending conspiracies like this one. These individuals fed off the addictions of others, and for that, they have been justly punished.”

The investigation of the case was conducted by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, the United States Postal Service, the Southwest Virginia Drug Task Force, the Virginia State Police, the Big Stone Gap Police Department, the Wise County Sheriff’s Office, the City of Norton Police Department, the Dickenson County Sheriff’s Office, the Sullivan County, Tennessee, Sheriff’s Office, the Coeburn Police Department, the Clintwood Police Department and the Wise Police Department. Assistant United States Attorney Erin M. Kulpa prosecuted the case for the United States.

Those charged are as follows:

Samuel Lee Courtney, 55, previously pleaded guilty to conspiracy to distribute and possess with the intent to distribute 564 grams of alpha-PVP and one count of possessing a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime. He was sentenced to 117 months in federal prison.

Bernard Anthony Murphy, 52, previously pleaded guilty to conspiracy to distribute and possess with the intent to distribute 450 grams of alpha-PVP. He was sentenced to 84 months in federal prison.

Lesley Marie Banks, 44, previously pleaded guilty to conspiracy to distribute and possess with the intent to distribute 370 grams of alpha-PVP. She was sentenced to 41 months in federal prison.

Eric Cameron Bright, 47, previously pleaded guilty to conspiracy to distribute and possess with the intent to distribute 10 kilograms of alpha-PVP. He was sentenced to 84 months in federal prison.

Victoria Diane Campbell, 25, previously pleaded guilty to conspiracy to distribute and possess with the intent to distribute 1.5 kilograms of alpha-PVP. She was sentenced to 57 months in federal prison.

courtesy of-

http://www.timesnews.net/Law-Enforcement/2016/07/14/Five-sentenced-in-massive-Gravel-conspiracy.html?ci=stream&lp=6&p=1

IDA Repays Loans to VCEDA

The Industrial Development Authority of Lee County (IDA) announced today (July 14, 2016) that it has repaid in full two loans totaling $423,400.00 to the Virginia Coalfield Economic Development Authority (VCEDA). The loans were originated in 2006 and 2008 to assist the IDA with economic development activities. “Over the last year-plus the IDA Board has paid off nearly 25% of its long term debt and greatly strengthened its financial position, stated Michael James, IDA Director. “We want to thank the Virginia Coalfield Economic Development Authority for their assistance over the years. This money will be applied to the pool available for our borrowing for future projects.”

“VCEDA has enjoyed a long successful relationship with the IDA of Lee County and look forward to working with them again in the future,” stated Jonathan Belcher, Executive Director and General Counsel for VCEDA.

About the Industrial Development Authority of Lee County: The mission of the IDA of Lee County is to promote and facilitate economic growth and development in Lee County by recruiting manufacturing, industrial and commercial enterprises to locate or remain in Lee County, promote entrepreneurism and to enhance the economic well being of the citizens of Lee County. Michael James has been Director of the Authority since May, 2011.

Cash Today Robbery Trial Begins

The trial against James Lawrence Jones of Jonesville began Monday. Jones is accused of robbing the "Cash Today" business in Pennington Gap in January of 2014. Four witnesses testified, including two from a restaurant and one from a convenience store, according to Circuit Court Clerk Rene Lamey. Lee County Sheriff's Department investigator Taylor Scott also testified. The Prosecutors in this case are Lee County Commonwealth Attorney Fuller Cridlin and Sarah Wynn.

Three shot in Dickenson County, shooter in custody

Three people were airlifted to the hospital after a shooting in Dickenson County near the Rose Ridge Road area.

WCYB reports that the gunman is in custody after barricading himself in his home for nearly 3 hours. The three victims are family members of the gunman.

State police say 52-year-old Jamie Sykes shot his wife, Teresa Sykes, and his in-laws, David and Glenna Robbins. One victim was shot outside of their home, the others were shot inside.


Sheriff's deputies and state police tactical teams surrounded the shooter's home on Hill Ridge road, that is about 4-miles from the crime scene. Police officers were able to negotiate with him by phone to surrender.

Investigators are still trying to piece together what led to the shooting.

His wife, Teresa Sykes, is in serious condition.
His mother-in-law,Glenna Robbins, is in critical condition and his father-in-law, David Robbins, is in fair condition.

Sykes is being held without bond at the Southwest Virginia Regional Jail in Haysi.
He is charged with three counts of attempted murder and one count of use of a firearm in commission of a felony.

 

courtesy of-

http://www.wcyb.com/news/three-shot-in-dickenson-county-search-for-shooter-underway/40468744

IDA Hosts POWER Grant Information Session

The Industrial Development Authority of Lee County and the Southwest Virginia Workforce Development Board will host a POWER Grant Information Session for dislocated coal industry workers on Tuesday, July 19th from 10 to 11 a.m. at the Pennington Gap Community Center in Pennington Gap.

Representatives from the Southwest Virginia Workforce Development Board-Area I, the Southwest Virginia Alliance for Manufacturing (SVAM), Mountain Empire Community College (MECC), and Southwest Virginia Community College (SWCC) will be on hand to discuss testing, credentialing, labor market information, jobs, retooling, and training opportunities.

POWER stands for Partnerships for Opportunity and Workforce and Economic Revitalization. This national dislocated worker grant was awarded to the Southwest Virginia Workforce Development Development-Area I and is specifically designed to help dislocated coal industry workers, which includes underground and surface coal miners, as well as non-miners in the coal business supply chain. http://www.swvawdb.org/for-job-seekers/power-grant-initiative/

Call 276/883-5038 for more information or email Stephen Mullins, Regional POWER Grant Coordinator, at smullins@wiaone.com.

 

About the Industrial Development Authority of Lee County: The mission of the IDA of Lee County is to promote and facilitate economic growth and development in Lee County by recruiting manufacturing, industrial and commercial enterprises to locate or remain in Lee County, promote entrepreneurism and to enhance the economic well being of the citizens of Lee County. Michael James has been Director of the Authority since May, 2011.

Mass. man recovers bible belonging to Lee County ancestor

It is not often you can flip through a book that was printed during George Washington’s presidency.

But Roger Baker has a Bible that belonged to his great-great-great-great-great-grandfather Andrew Baker.

Andrew (1749-1815) was a pastor who lived in North Carolina and Virginia with his wife Elizabeth Avant (or Avent, depending on where you look). Andrew had nine children and fought in the Revolutionary War, Roger said.

“It’s a wonderful thing to be able to say I know who owned this, and it’s 220 years old,” said Roger, who was born in Kendrick and is now retired and living in Worcester, Mass.

“It’s important that people realize that we have a past, and we have a heritage, and if you go far enough into the future that past tends to get diluted more and more and more,” he said.

Roger has had the Bible, which includes the Old and New Testaments, about a month. Roger said it was printed in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1796, and it appears the Psalms of David pages were added in 1797.

The Bible also had papers in it, including a song most likely written about the Civil War and a Sunday reading by Henry Ward Beecher, an American Congregationalist clergyman, social reformer and speaker in the 1800s.

The Bible has the birthdates of Andrew’s children written on one page inside it. A page with the youngest child’s birth date was lost when the Bible was given to a university for a study, Roger said he was told.

Roger, 67, was tracking down his family history online when he came across a picture of Andrew’s grave and pictures of the opening page of the Bible and names on the back of the Bible.

From his online search, Roger knew the Bible existed, but he did not know who owned it.

Roger drove from Worcester to Jonesville, Va., location of the Lee County Historical and Genealogical Society. There, he visited Andrew’s nearby grave at Robert Clark Cemetery and stopped at Thompson Settlement Baptist Church, where Andrew was a pastor more than 200 years ago.

The church clerk, Carolyn Jerrell, told Roger she had an idea of who might have it.

Jerrell put him in touch with a woman who took him to Delores Ramsey, across the state line in Tennessee, he said.

Ramsey, 74, had the old Bible. It turned out that when the Bakers moved west to Ohio probably more than 100 years ago, the Bible stayed with the Ramsey family.

“Somebody in the Baker family gave it to the Ramsey family for safekeeping,” and it was passed down through their family, Roger said.

Ramsey gave Roger the Bible, and he will soon give it to the Lee County historical society, he said.

“It’s always nice to hold something in your hand and say my fifth-great grandfather read from this and people heard it,” Roger said.

Roger said the Bakers eventually homesteaded in Deary in the late 1800s or early 1900s.

Roger said he has driven to California, Oregon, Washington and now Idaho to share the Bible with his family.

Roger said the family will remember the Baker family members who are buried at Elwood Cemetery and revisit old stories.

On his way home, Roger said he will show the Bible to his daughter in Georgia and his son in Alabama, and then drop the Bible off at the Lee County Historical and Genealogical Society, along with a notebook signed by those who have seen the Bible.

Roger said that usually when tracing your ancestry you are likely to find only a name and possibly a date of birth and a date of death on a tombstone.

He actually has physical evidence of what his fifth-great grandfather did, and who he was.

“I look at this (Bible), and I get a sense of this is where my family began,” Roger said.

 

courtesy of-

http://www.postregister.com/articles/todays-headlines-west/2016/07/09/220-year-old-bible-back-family%E2%80%99s-hands

WCSO Weekly Press Release

WEEKLY PRESS RELEASE
 
July 7, 2016
 
The Wise County Sheriff’s Office reports the following activities for the period of 06/27/2016 through 07/03/2016.
 
Wise Central Dispatch received a total of 1,728 calls for this seven-day period.
Of the total calls received 386 were dispatched to the Sheriff’s Office
Total number of Domestic calls for this period was 6.
Criminal Process for this period:  Served 19 Felony Warrants, 61 Misdemeanor Warrants, 3 DUI Arrests.
Civil Process Served: 638 Civil Papers
Traffic Accidents:  6
11 Additional Criminal Investigations were initiated and 41 Cleared by Arrest.
Sheriff’s Office provided 216 man-hours of Court Room Security.
Unlocked Vehicles: 18
Escorted Funerals:  6
 
The Sheriff’s Office Total Transport for this period:  7
Total Transport Hours:  51
 
1,543 Visitors to Courthouse.